1-7 of 25     Next


Earlier this year I wrote a piece on the need to learn from the ERA-223 experience and pitched it in the context of the Apollo 13 moon mission, dubbed a “successful failure’ because it revealed a variety of problems in the space mission and created the opportunity to revise process based on continued close scrutiny of the data*. At ESMO 2018, the closer scrutiny of ERA-223 has indeed delivered some new information about our best practices in mCRPC.
Here’s some interesting science to follow and think about in the context of mCRPC treatment. – how cancer and cancer treatment will influence and even accelerate aging – and what we can do about it.

My institution, the University of Minnesota, recently launched a “Medical Discovery Team on the Biology of Aging” a program that brings together clinicians,
If things were different, I might be writing this blog about using Selinexor in prostate cancer.

Or,  I might be working on the design of the phase III study of BEZ235 in mCRPC, or the use of AMG-102 plus mitoxantrone in patients following docetaxel for mCRPC.
A new diagnosis of metastatic prostate cancer is life-altering.  Deciding on the treatment used to be straightforward but it’s not anymore. After addressing this issue with patients for many years, and staying abreast of the latest developments, I describe an approach to starting treatment in five questions for both the patient
Ever since they were introduced, the question of the efficacy of a combined approach with abiraterone and enzalutamide has been questioned.  We are now getting to the point of seeing the results of these approaches and a window into how similar, or distinct, these two therapies are.
I quip sometimes when lecturing that a clinician will make their first decision to use a new therapy based on the data - but the second time they make the decision to use that therapy it will be based on their experience. Although obviously a gross oversimplification,  I think it does reflect the fact that we obtain biases as we treat patients. 
The standard of care for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has changed so much in the past decade that it is sometimes hard to keep up with what might be coming down the pipeline. The TROPIC Study, when it became public back in about 2011, was a complete surprise to me. The first I heard of the study was when the trial reported out the survival data and almost

1-7 of 25     Next

E-Newsletters

Newsletter subscription

Free Daily and Weekly newsletters offered by content of interest

The fields of GU Oncology and Urology are rapidly advancing. Sign up today for articles, videos, conference highlights and abstracts from peer-review publications by disease and condition delivered to your inbox and read on the go.

Subscribe