Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for testicular seminomas: population-based practice and survival outcomes

While retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) is traditionally reserved for nonseminomatous germ cell tumors, recent efforts to reduce long-term toxicities of radiation and chemotherapy have turned attention to its application for testicular seminomas. Currently, RPLND is reserved for the post-chemotherapy for stage II testicular seminomas; we aimed to describe current utilization of RPNLD for testicular seminomas by stage and implications for survival.

A national sample of men diagnosed with stage IA/IB/IS/IIA/IIB/IIC testicular seminoma (1988-2013) was evaluated from SEER Program registries. Stage-specific utilization of RPLND was determined. Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for age, race, and radiotherapy, evaluated overall (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) for the RPLND cohort. Adjusted models assessed predictors of RPLND.

A total of 17,681 men (mean age 38.1 years) with testicular seminoma were included with low utilization of RPLND for stage I disease (1.3% overall) and higher rates for stage II disease (10.6% overall). There were no appreciable trends over time. Patients receiving RPLND did not appear to have worse OS or CSS on adjusted stage-by-stage analysis. Higher stage disease (IIA-IIC) was associated with greater need for RPLND while radiotherapy was associated with decreased use [OR 0.40 (0.32-0.51), p < 0.001].

Utilization of RPLND for testicular seminomas in the post-chemotherapy setting has remained stable over a 25-year period. Patients undergoing RPLND are a higher risk cohort but stage-by-stage survival outcomes appeared comparable to men not undergoing RPLND. Upcoming trials implementing RPLND as a first-line modality for testicular seminoma or isolated retroperitoneal relapse will help better quantify relative recurrence and survival.

World journal of urology. 2017 Oct 12 [Epub ahead of print]

Hiten D Patel, Gregory A Joice, Zeyad R Schwen, Alice Semerjian, Ridwan Alam, Arnav Srivastava, Mohamad E Allaf, Phillip M Pierorazio

The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute and Department of Urology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe Street/Marburg 134, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. ., The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute and Department of Urology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe Street/Marburg 134, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA.

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