Extreme Obesity Does Not Predict Poor Cancer Outcomes Following Surgery for Renal Cell Cancer

OBJECTIVE - To evaluate if extreme obesity (BMI ≥ 40) is associated with perioperative outcomes, overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), or recurrence-free survival (RFS) after surgical treatment for RCC.

PATIENTS AND METHODS - After IRB approval, an institutional database identified patients treated surgically between January 2000 and December 2014 with pathologic diagnosis of RCC. Comprehensive clinical and pathologic data were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to estimate OS, RFS, and CSS. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to evaluate for associations with OS, CSS and RFS in patients with extreme obesity among other known predictive variables.

RESULTS - A total 100 (11. 9%) patients were identified with BMI ≥ 40 and 743 (88. 1%) with BMI

CONCLUSIONS - Extreme obesity is not associated with worse perioperative or cancer outcomes after surgery for RCC. Surgery should remain a standard treatment option in well selected morbidly obese patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

BJU international. 2015 Nov 21 [Epub ahead of print]

Michael L Blute, Kristin Zorn, Matthew Grimes, Fangfang Shi, Tracy M Downs, David F Jarrard, Sara L Best, Kyle Richards, Stephen Y Nakada, E Jason Abel

Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. , Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. , Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. , Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. , Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. , Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. , Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. , Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. , Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI. , Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI.

PubMed

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