Androgen deprivation therapy and cardiovascular risk: No meaningful difference between GnRH antagonist and agonists-a nationwide population-based cohort study based on 2010-2013 French Health Insurance data

Observational studies suggested that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is associated with an increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. They all compared ADT-treated cancer patients to non-treated patients or non-cancer subjects. Our aim was to evaluate whether CV risk differs by type of ADT.

Through nationwide population-based claims reimbursement database linked to hospital discharge database, we identified adult men with prostate cancer who initiated ADT (gonadotrophin releasing hormone [GnRH] agonist or antagonist, antiandrogen [AA], combined androgen blockade [CAB]) or had orchiectomy (OT) between 1st July, 2010, and the 31st December, 2011, and followed them up to 31st December, 2013. The main analysis followed an 'on-treatment' approach that censored all patients at the time of first therapeutic modification; it used Cox regression analysis to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for hospitalisations for ischaemic events (myocardial infarction or ischaemic stroke, whichever came first), adjusted on age, baseline co-morbidities and taking into account death as a competing risk.

Among the 35,118 new ADT users, 71% received GnRH agonist (reference group), 12% CAB, 13% AA, 3.6% GnRH antagonist and 0.6% had OT. CAB was associated with an increased risk (adjusted HR [95% confidence interval {CI}], 1.6 [1.3-2.0]) and AA with a decreased risk (adjusted HR [95% CI], 0.6 [0.4-0.9]) of ischaemic events when compared to GnRH agonist. No significant association was found with GnRH antagonist (adjusted HR [95% CI], 1.2 (0.7-2.1)).

CV risk appeared different across ADT modalities. The probability of a clinically meaningful difference when comparing GnRH antagonists to agonists appears rather low. In a context where better overall and cancer specific survival without worsening quality of life is a challenge for clinicians, a potential heterogeneity in CV morbidity becomes crucial when choosing an ADT.

European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990). 2017 Apr 05 [Epub ahead of print]

Lucie-Marie Scailteux, Sébastien Vincendeau, Frédéric Balusson, Christophe Leclercq, André Happe, Béranger Le Nautout, Elisabeth Polard, Emmanuel Nowak, Emmanuel Oger

Pharmacovigilance, Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Information Center, Rennes University Hospital, Rennes, France. Electronic address: ., Urology Department, Rennes University Hospital, Rennes, France., PEPS Research Consortium, Rennes Hospital University, Rennes, France., Cardiology Department, Rennes University Hospital, Rennes, France., Pharmacovigilance, Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Information Center, Rennes University Hospital, Rennes, France; PEPS Research Consortium, Rennes Hospital University, Rennes, France., PEPS Research Consortium, Rennes Hospital University, Rennes, France; Université Européenne de Bretagne, Université de Brest, INSERM CIC 1412, IFR 148 et CHU de Brest, France., Pharmacovigilance, Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Information Center, Rennes University Hospital, Rennes, France; PEPS Research Consortium, Rennes Hospital University, Rennes, France; UPRES, EA 7449, REPERES "Research in Pharmacoepidemiology and Access to Care", Rennes, France.

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