A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery.

The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient's health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells.

Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA⁺ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

International journal of molecular sciences. 2016 Mar 14*** epublish ***

John C Leach, Andrew Wang, Kaiming Ye, Sha Jin

Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA. Ocean Nanotech, 2143 Worth Lane, Springdale, AR 72764, USA. Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA. Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA.