Prognostic value of the bone scan index using a computer-aided diagnosis system for bone scans in hormone-naive prostate cancer patients with bone metastases.

BACKGROUND - The bone scan index (BSI) using a computer-aided diagnosis system for bone scans is expected to be an objective and quantitative clinical tool for evaluating bone metastatic prostate cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the pretreatment BSI as a prognostic factor in hormone-naive prostate cancer patients with bone metastases.

METHODS - The study included 60 patients with hormone-naive, bone metastatic prostate cancer that was initially treated with combined androgen blockade therapy. The BONENAVI system was used for calculating the BSI. We evaluated the correlation between overall survival (OS) and pretreatment clinicopathological characteristics, including patients' age, initial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value, Gleason scores, clinical TNM stage, and the BSI. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for statistical analysis.

RESULTS - The median follow-up duration was 21.4 months. Clinical or PSA progression occurred in 37 (61.7 %) patients and 18 (30.0 %) received docetaxel. Death occurred in 16 (26.7 %) patients. Of these deaths, 15 (25.0 %) were due to prostate cancer. The median OS was not reached. In multivariate analysis, age and the BSI were independent prognostic factors for OS. We evaluated the discriminatory ability of our models, including or excluding BSI by quantifying the C-index. The BSI improved the C-index from 0.751 to 0.801 for OS. Median OS was not reached in patients with a BSI ≤1.9 and median OS was 34.8 months in patients with a BSI >1.9 (p = 0.039).

CONCLUSIONS - The pretreatment BSI and patients' age are independent prognostic factors for patients with hormone-naive, bone metastatic prostate cancer.

BMC cancer. 2016 Feb 19*** epublish ***

Yasuhide Miyoshi, Shuko Yoneyama, Takashi Kawahara, Yusuke Hattori, Jun-Ichi Teranishi, Keiichi Kondo, Masatoshi Moriyama, Shigeo Takebayashi, Yumiko Yokomizo, Masahiro Yao, Hiroji Uemura, Kazumi Noguchi

Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, 232-0024, Japan. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, 232-0024, Japan. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, 232-0024, Japan. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, 232-0024, Japan. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, 232-0024, Japan. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, 232-0024, Japan. Department of Urology, Yokohama Municipal Citizen's Hospital, Yokohama, Japan. Department of Radiology, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan.  Department of Urology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan. Department of Urology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, 232-0024, Japan. Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, 232-0024, Japan. 

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