Ten-year outcomes of intensity-modulated radiation therapy combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy for intermediate- and high-risk patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer.

BACKGROUND - We aimed to analyze the 10-year outcomes of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (HT) for patients with intermediate- and high-risk T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer.

METHODS - Fifty patients with T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer, who were treated with high-dose IMRT combined with neoadjuvant HT, were evaluated. Of these patients, 19 and 31 were classified into the intermediate- and high-risk groups, respectively. Neoadjuvant HT was administered over a median duration of 6 months; 74 and 78 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction were essentially delivered to the intermediate- and high-risk cases, respectively. Adjuvant HT was not administered to any of the patients after the completion of IMRT.

RESULTS - Over a median follow-up period of 118 months, the 10-year prostate-specific antigen failure-free survival, prostate-specific antigen failure-free, salvage hormonal therapy-free, prostate cancer-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 70. 2 %, 78. 7 %, 89. 2 %, 100 %, and 88. 8 %, respectively. No grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities were observed. The 10-year likelihoods of developing grade 2 late urinary and rectal toxicities were 13. 7 % and 4. 2 %, respectively. Compared with the outcomes of a cohort of historical controls who were locally irradiated with 70 Gy by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, the prostate-specific antigen failure-free rate was significantly better in the IMRT groups (78. 7 % vs. 53. 4 % at 10 years; p = 0. 027).

CONCLUSIONS - High-dose IMRT combined with neoadjuvant HT achieved not only high prostate-specific antigen control, but also excellent survival outcomes with acceptable morbidities, for a Japanese cohort of intermediate- and high-risk T1c-T2N0M0 prostate cancer patients, and these results warrant further investigation.

International journal of clinical oncology. 2016 Feb 03 [Epub ahead of print]

Takashi Mizowaki, Yoshiki Norihisa, Kenji Takayama, Itaru Ikeda, Haruo Inokuchi, Kiyonao Nakamura, Tomomi Kamba, Takahiro Inoue, Toshiyuki Kamoto, Osamu Ogawa, Masahiro Hiraoka

Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. , Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. , Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. , Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. , Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan. , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan.

PubMed