Prostate specific G protein coupled receptor is associated with prostate cancer prognosis and affects cancer cell proliferation and invasion.

BACKGROUND - There is limited information about the clinical and biological significance of prostate specific G protein coupled receptor (PSGR) in prostate cancer (PCa) initiation and progression. Here, we evaluated the expression of PSGR protein, studied its diagnostic and prognostic value in PCa, and also explored its role in cancer cell growth and invasion.

METHODS - The expression of PSGR in paired adjacent normal prostate, high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and PCa were determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays constructed from 150 radical prostatectomy specimens. The effects of PSGR on PCa cell growth and invasion were investigated using human PCa cell lines.

RESULTS - Membranous and cytoplasmic PSGR staining was observed at luminal epithelial cells of prostate. PSGR protein expression was significantly higher in PIN compared to normal prostate. Interestingly, the expression of PSGR decreased as PIN progressed to PCa. Low PSGR expression in PCa was associated with high Gleason score, and poor overall survival. Activated PSGR increased cancer cell invasive ability, but retarded cell growth. PSGR did not affect mTOR activity, but suppressed P70 S6 kinase activity.

CONCLUSIONS - PSGR may participate in PCa progression through affecting cell proliferation and invasion. High expression of PSGR in PIN may implicate its role in early neoplastic transformation of PCa. Low expression of PSGR in PCa may serve as a potential indicator for poor prognosis.

BMC cancer. 2015 Nov 18*** epublish ***

Wenqing Cao, Faqian Li, Jorge Yao, Jiangzhou Yu

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.  Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA.

PubMed      Full Text Article

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