Calcium Ion Flow Permeates Cells through SOCs to Promote Cathode-Directed Galvanotaxis.

Sensing and responding to endogenous electrical fields are important abilities for cells engaged in processes such as embryogenesis, regeneration and wound healing. Many types of cultured cells have been induced to migrate directionally within electrical fields in vitro using a process known as galvanotaxis.

The underlying mechanism by which cells sense electrical fields is unknown. In this study, we assembled a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) galvanotaxis system and found that mouse fibroblasts and human prostate cancer PC3 cells migrated to the cathode. By comparing the effects of a pulsed direct current, a constant direct current and an anion-exchange membrane on the directed migration of mouse fibroblasts, we found that these cells responded to the ionic flow in the electrical fields. Taken together, the observed effects of the calcium content of the medium, the function of the store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) and the intracellular calcium content on galvanotaxis indicated that calcium ionic flow from the anode to the cathode within the culture medium permeated the cells through SOCs at the drift velocity, promoting migration toward the cathode. The RTK-PI3K pathway was involved in this process, but the ROCK and MAPK pathways were not. PC3 cells and mouse fibroblasts utilized the same mechanism of galvanotaxis. Together, these results indicated that the signaling pathway responsible for cathode-directed cellular galvanotaxis involved calcium ionic flow from the anode to the cathode within the culture medium, which permeated the cells through SOCs, causing cytoskeletal reorganization via PI3K signaling.

PloS one. 2015 Oct 08*** epublish ***

Liang Guo, Chunyan Xu, Dong Li, Xiulan Zheng, Jiebing Tang, Jingyi Bu, Hui Sun, Zhengkai Yang, Wenjing Sun, Xiaoguang Yu

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China; Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001, P. R. China; Bioinformatics Research Center, College of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 150001, P. R. China. , Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China. , Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China. , Department of Ultrasonography, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China. , Department of Clinical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China. , Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China. , Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China. , Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China. , Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China. , Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Basic Medical Science, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081, P. R. China.

PubMed