Course and moderators of hot flash interference during androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer: A matched comparison - Abstract

PURPOSE: Many men receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer experience hot flashes.

This study aimed to describe the course of hot flash interference (HFI) over time in ADT recipients relative to matched prostate cancer and cancer-free controls, from before the start of ADT to 12 months later. We also examined demographic, clinical, and genetic predictors of the impact of ADT on hot flash interference.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three groups were examined: prostate cancer patients recruited before or within 21 days of starting ADT (n=60), age- and education-matched prostate cancer patients treated with prostatectomy only (n=83), and age- and education-matched men with no history of cancer (n=86). Participants provided blood samples and completed the Hot Flash Daily Interference Scale at baseline as well as 6 and 12 months later.

RESULTS: ADT recipients reported increasing HFI over time relative to controls (p< .001). Group differences were evident at 6 and 12 months (ps< .001), with ADT recipients reporting greater HFI than controls. Several genetic polymorphisms were found to predict greater increases in HFI (ps< .01), including polymorphisms on genes associated with vasoconstriction, immune function, neurotransmission, and circadian rhythms. ADT recipients who were younger and had lower body mass index at baseline also exhibited greater increases in HFI over time (ps≤ .01).

CONCLUSIONS: This study, the first to prospectively examine HFI in ADT recipients, found that those with certain genetic polymorphisms, younger age, and lower BMI had greater increases in HFI over time relative to controls.

Written by:
Gonzalez BD, Jim HS, Donovan KA, Small BJ, Sutton SK, Park J, Lin HY, Spiess PE, Fishman MN, Jacobsen PB.   Are you the author?
Health Outcomes and Behavior Program, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA; Supportive Care Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA; School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA; Department of Cancer Epidemiology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA; Department of Genitourinary Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA.  

Reference: J Urol. 2015 Mar 16. pii: S0022-5347(15)03318-2.
doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2015.03.026


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25791402

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