Stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients with old age or medical comorbidity: A 5-year follow-up of an investigational study - Abstract

We evaluated 5-year follow-up of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with Cyberknife for prostate cancer patients.

Forty-five men with prostate adenocarcinoma who received SBRT using Cyberknife from May 2006 to November 2012 were enrolled in this study. They were prostate cancer patients with old age and medical comorbidities who received a total of 36 Gy to the prostate in 5 fractions with either everyday or every other day schedule. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at initial diagnosis and after radiation were traced. Primary endpoints were biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). The definition of biochemical relapse was a PSA level of nadir+2 ng/mL. Progression was defined as biochemically or clinically detected disease and the start of salvage therapy. After median follow-up of 63 months, the 5-year bRFS for all patients was estimated at 89.7%. The 5-year PFS was estimated at 71%. Four cases of biochemical relapse were observed, including two patients who experienced locoregional failure and one patient who had distant metastasis with biochemical relapse. The 5-year OS was estimated at 94.3%. There were five deaths, all of which were unrelated to prostate cancer. There was no grade 3 or higher acute complication. Grade 3 or higher late urinary toxicity was reported in 2 (4.4%) of 45 patients. The 5-year survival and toxicity outcome of SBRT using Cyberknife on prostate cancer patients with old age or comorbidities were favorable and safe in an investigational study.

Written by:
Lee SW, Jang HS, Lee JH, Kim SH, Yoon SC.   Are you the author?
Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincent's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; and Department of Radiation Oncology, Bucheon St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Reference: Medicine (Baltimore). 2014 Dec;93(28):e290.
doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000000290


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25526468

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