Cribriform growth is highly predictive for postoperative metastasis and disease-specific death in Gleason score 7 prostate cancer - Abstract

Patients with Gleason score 7 prostate cancer on radical prostatectomy demonstrate a wide range in clinical outcome.

Gleason grade 4 prostate cancer encompasses a heterogeneous group of tumor growth patterns including fused, ill-defined, cribriform, and glomeruloid glandular structures. Our objective was to determine the prognostic value of different Gleason grade 4 growth patterns. We performed a nested case-control study among 535 patients with Gleason score 7 prostate cancer at radical prostatectomy, treated between March 1985 and July 2013 at a university hospital in the Netherlands. We analyzed 52 cases (with metastasis, disease-specific mortality or both) and 109 controls, matched for age, PSA level, and pT stage. Presence of the following Gleason grade 4 patterns was recorded: fused, ill-defined, cribriform, and glomeruloid. Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate and tertiary Gleason grade 5 were additionally assessed. Outcomes were metastasis-free survival and disease-specific survival. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to determine the predictive value of Gleason grade 4 patterns for survival time. The overall prevalence of Gleason grade 4 patterns was as follows: fused 75% (n=121), ill-defined 64% (n=102), cribriform 48% (n=83), and glomeruloid 25% (n=40). Cribriform pattern was the only pattern with an unequal distribution between cases and controls. Forty-two out of 52 cases (81%) had cribriform growth pattern versus 41/109 controls (38%). In multivariate analysis, presence of cribriform growth was an adverse independent predictor for distant metastasis-free survival (HR 8.0, 95% CI 3.0-21; P< 0.001) and disease-specific survival (HR 5.4, 95% CI 2.0-15, P=0.001). In conclusion, cribriform growth in Gleason grade 4 is a strong prognostic marker for distant metastasis and disease-specific death in patients with Gleason score 7 prostate cancer at radical prostatectomy.

Written by:
Kweldam CF, Wildhagen MF, Steyerberg EW, Bangma CH, van der Kwast TH, van Leenders GJ.   Are you the author?
Department of Pathology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Research Office Sophia, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Urology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Center for Medical Decision Making, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.

Reference: Mod Pathol. 2014 Sep 5. Epub ahead of print.
doi: 10.1038/modpathol.2014.116


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25189638

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