Approach and avoidance coping: Diurnal cortisol rhythm in prostate cancer survivors - Abstract

Psychological coping responses likely modulate the negative physiological consequences of cancer-related demands.

This longitudinal, observational study examined how approach- and avoidance-oriented strategies for coping with cancer are associated with diurnal cortisol rhythm in prostate cancer (PC) survivors. Sixty-six men (M age=65.76; SD=9.04) who had undergone radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy for localized PC within the prior two years reported their use of approach and avoidance coping via questionnaire at study entry (T1). Participants provided saliva samples (3 times per day over 3 days) for diurnal cortisol assessment at T1 and again 4 months later (T2). When controlling for relevant biobehavioral covariates, cancer-related avoidance-oriented coping was associated with flatter cortisol slopes at T1 (B=.34, p=.03) and at T2 (B=.30, p=.02). Approach-oriented coping was not associated with cortisol slopes. Post-hoc analyses revealed a significant interaction between avoidant coping and time since completion of cancer treatment on T2 cortisol slope (B=-.05, p=.04). Men who used relatively more avoidance-oriented coping who were further in time from treatment demonstrated a flatter cortisol slope. High avoidance-oriented coping is associated with dysregulation of cortisol responses, which may be an important target for reducing stress during PC survivorship.

Written by:
Hoyt MA, Marin-Chollom AM, Bower JE, Thomas KS, Irwin MR, Stanton AL.   Are you the author?
Department of Psychology, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York, NY, United States; Department of Psychology, Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY, United States; Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States; Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, Semel Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States; Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, United States; Department of Psychology, Pitzer College, Claremont University Consortium, Claremont, CA, United States.  

Reference: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2014 Jul 17;49C:182-186.
doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.07.007


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25108161

UroToday.com Prostate Cancer Section

 

 

E-Newsletters

Newsletter subscription

Free Daily and Weekly newsletters offered by content of interest

The fields of GU Oncology and Urology are rapidly advancing. Sign up today for articles, videos, conference highlights and abstracts from peer-review publications by disease and condition delivered to your inbox and read on the go.

Subscribe