Correlation of integrated ERG/PTEN assessment with biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease, with a complex molecular landscape that evolves throughout disease progression. Common alterations in genes such as ERG and PTEN have been attributed to worse prognosis. This study aimed to further examine the clinical relevance of PTEN and ERG expression in a cohort of patients with prostate cancer post radical prostatectomy.

Tissue microarrays were constructed from 132 patients with prostate cancer from the Irish Prostate Cancer Research Consortium and University Hospital of Orebro, Sweden. Patients were divided into three groups - Group 1: biochemical recurrence, Group 2: no biochemical recurrence and Group 3: immediate progression after surgery. PTEN and ERG immunohistochemical analysis was performed and the association between expression levels and clinical parameters were compared.

Pathological stage pT3 tumours were more common at borderline significantly higher levels amongst patients who biochemically recurred when compared to patients who did not recur after radical prostatectomy (p = 0.05). ERG and PTEN expression levels were compared separately and concurrently across all three patient groups. Lack of ERG expression was strongly associated with immediate progression after surgery (p = 0.029). Loss of/low PTEN trended towards an association with immediate progression, however this was not statistically significant (p = 0.066).

In this study, negative ERG expression was strongly associated with immediate biochemical progression after radical prostatectomy. Moreover, a trend towards a relationship between aberrant PTEN expression and progression was observed. Additional studies with long-term follow up data may provide further clinical insight into the genomic heterogeneity in this population.

Cancer treatment and research communications. 2021 Sep 02 [Epub ahead of print]

Lauren Brady, Jessica Carlsson, Anne-Marie Baird, Orla Casey, Tatjana Vlajnic, Pierre Murchan, David Cormican, Danielle Costigan, Steven Gray, Orla Sheils, Amanda O'Neill, R William Watson, Ove Andren, Stephen Finn

Department of Histopathology and Morbid Anatomy, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland., Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Orebro, Sweden., School of Medicine, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland., Pathology, Institute of Medical Genetics and Pathology, University Hospital Basel, University of Basel, Switzerland., Thoracic Oncology Research Group, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland., UCD School of Medicine, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland., Department of Histopathology and Morbid Anatomy, Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland; Department of Histopathology, St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Electronic address: .

email news signup