Adaptive radiation therapy for bladder cancer: a review of adaptive techniques used in clinical practice

Significant changes in the shape, size and position of the bladder during radiotherapy (RT) treatment for bladder cancer have been correlated with high local failure rates; typically due to geographical misses. To account for this, large margins are added around the target volumes in conventional RT; however, this increases the volume of healthy tissue irradiation. The availability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has not only allowed in-room volumetric imaging of the bladder, but also the development of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for modification of plans to patient-specific changes. The aim of this review is to: (1) identify and explain the different ART techniques being used in clinical practice and (2) compare and contrast these different ART techniques to conventional RT in terms of target coverage and dose to healthy tissue: A literature search was conducted using EMBASE, MEDLINE and Scopus with the key words 'bladder, adaptive, radiotherapy/radiation therapy'. 11 studies were obtained that compared different adaptive RT techniques to conventional RT in terms of target volume coverage and healthy tissue sparing. All studies showed superior target volume coverage and/or healthy tissue sparing in adaptive RT compared to conventional RT. Cross-study comparison between different adaptive techniques could not be made due to the difference in protocols used in different studies. However, one study found daily re-optimisation of plans to be superior to plan of the day technique. The use of adaptive RT for bladder cancer is promising. Further study is required to assess adaptive RT versus conventional RT in terms of local control and long-term toxicity.

Journal of medical radiation sciences. 2015 Oct 06 [Epub]

Awet Z Kibrom, Kellie A Knight

Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences School of Biomedical Sciences Monash University Clayton Victoria Australia., Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences School of Biomedical Sciences Monash University Clayton Victoria Australia.

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