Underutilization of Blue Light Cystoscopy for Bladder Cancer in the United States.

Blue light cystoscopy (BLC) during transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) is guideline-recommended as it improves cancer detection and decreases recurrence of the disease. However, the extent to which BLC is used has not been established.

We studied BLC use in the Premier Healthcare Database, a large, national sample that captured 158 870 index TURBT procedures between January 2011 and March 2020. Billing data were queried for the administration of hexaminolevulinate at TURBT as a proxy for BLC, and logistic regression models were constructed to identify variables associated with BLC use.

BLC was used in 1.2% of index TURBT procedures over the study period. Its use increased following the American Urological Association non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer guideline publication in October 2016 but plateaued in late 2018. After adjusting for patient characteristics, higher odds for BLC use were found for academic hospitals and hospitals with higher TURBT volumes and higher radical cystectomy volumes. Within hospitals with BLC capability, predictors of a surgeon never using BLC included low surgeon TURBT volumes, low surgeon radical cystectomy volumes, and lack of mitomycin C use. Our findings highlight a concerning underutilization and stagnation in the adoption of evidence and guideline-supported intervention. PATIENT SUMMARY: Use of blue light visualization of the bladder improves the detection of cancer during removal of bladder tumors via the urethra. We reviewed records in a large US database for use of this technique and found that it is being underutilized. Since this technique improves detection of cancer in the bladder so that it can be removed to reduce recurrence, blue light visualization should be more widely used.

European urology focus. 2021 Oct 25 [Epub ahead of print]

Patrick Lewicki, Camilo Arenas-Gallo, Yuqing Qiu, Siv Venkat, Spyridon P Basourakos, Douglas Scherr, Jonathan E Shoag

Department of Urology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA., Department of Urology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA., Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA., Department of Urology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA; Department of Urology, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA. Electronic address: .

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