European Association of Urology Guidelines on Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer (TaT1 and Carcinoma In Situ) - 2019 Update.

This overview presents the updated European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), TaT1, and carcinoma in situ (CIS).

To provide practical recommendations on the clinical management of NMIBC with a focus on clinical presentation and recommendations.

A broad and comprehensive scoping exercise covering all areas of the NMIBC guidelines has been performed annually since the last published version in 2017. Databases covered by the search included Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Libraries. Previous guidelines were updated, and the level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned.

Tumours staged as Ta, T1, and/or CIS are grouped under the heading of NMIBC. Diagnosis depends on cystoscopy and histological evaluation of the tissue obtained by transurethral resection (TURB) in papillary tumours or by multiple bladder biopsies in CIS. In papillary lesions, a complete TURB is essential for the patient's prognosis and correct diagnosis. Where the initial resection is incomplete, where there is no muscle in the specimen, or where a T1 tumour is detected, a second TURB should be performed within 2-6 wk. The risks of both recurrence and progression may be estimated for individual patients using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) scoring system. Stratification of patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups is pivotal to the recommendation of adjuvant treatment. In patients with tumours presumed to be at a low risk and in those presumed to be at an intermediate risk with a low previous recurrence rate and an expected EORTC recurrence score of <5, one immediate chemotherapy instillation is recommended. Patients with intermediate-risk tumours should receive 1 yr of full-dose bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) intravesical immunotherapy or instillations of chemotherapy for a maximum of 1 yr. In patients with high-risk tumours, full-dose intravesical BCG for 1-3 yr is indicated. In patients at the highest risk of tumour progression, immediate radical cystectomy should be considered. Cystectomy is recommended in BCG-unresponsive tumours. The extended version of the guidelines is available at the EAU website: https://uroweb.org/guideline/non-muscle-invasive-bladder-cancer/.

These abridged EAU guidelines present updated information on the diagnosis and treatment of NMIBC for incorporation into clinical practice.

The European Association of Urology Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC) Panel has released an updated version of their guidelines, which contains information on classification, risk factors, diagnosis, prognostic factors, and treatment of NMIBC. The recommendations are based on the current literature (until the end of 2018), with emphasis on high-level data from randomised clinical trials and meta-analyses. Stratification of patients into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups is essential for deciding appropriate use of adjuvant intravesical chemotherapy or bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) instillations. Surgical removal of the bladder should be considered in case of BCG-unresponsive tumours or in NMIBCs with the highest risk of progression.

European urology. 2019 Aug 20 [Epub ahead of print]

Marko Babjuk, Maximilian Burger, Eva M Compérat, Paolo Gontero, A Hugh Mostafid, Joan Palou, Bas W G van Rhijn, Morgan Rouprêt, Shahrokh F Shariat, Richard Sylvester, Richard Zigeuner, Otakar Capoun, Daniel Cohen, José Luis Dominguez Escrig, Virginia Hernández, Benoit Peyronnet, Thomas Seisen, Viktor Soukup

Department of Urology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Hospital Motol, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: ., Department of Urology, Caritas St. Josef Medical Centre, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany., Department of Pathology, Hôpital Tenon, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, UPMC Paris VI, Paris, France., Division of Urology, Molinette Hospital, University of Studies of Torino, Torino, Italy., Department of Urology, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey, UK., Department of Urology, Fundació Puigvert, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain., Department of Urology, Caritas St. Josef Medical Centre, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Department of Surgical Oncology (Urology), Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands., Urology Department, Sorbonne Université, GRC n°5, ONCOTYPE-URO, AP-HP, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France., Department of Urology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Hospital Motol, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; Department of Urology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; Department of Urology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; Institute for Urology and Reproductive Health, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia., European Association of Urology Guidelines Office, Brussels, Belgium., Department of Urology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria., Department of Urology, General University Hospital, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic., Department of Urology, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK., Department of Urology, Fundación Instituto Valenciano de Oncología, Valencia, Spain., Department of Urology, Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain., Department of Urology, University of Rennes, Rennes, France.

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