Nocturnal enuresis: prevalence and associated LUTS in adult women attending a urogynaecology clinic

Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is an underreported symptom with a profound impact on quality of life. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of NE and its association with other lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

A validated pelvic floor questionnaire [electronic Personal Assessment Questionnaire-Pelvic Floor (ePAQ-PF)] was completed by 2302 women attending a urogynaecology clinic over a 3-year period. Association between NE and overactive bladder (OAB), stress incontinence (SUI) and nocturia was assessed using logistic regression. Subgroup analysis was performed on women with NE undergoing transvaginal tape (TVT). Ethical approval was acquired from the University of Sheffield and statistical analysis performed using SPSS version 22.

The overall prevalence of NE reported in the cohort was 23 % (536 women). The reporting of NE was significantly associated with OAB (p < 0.005), SUI (p < 0.005) and nocturia (p < 0.005). Of 84 women undergoing TVT, 49 % reported NE preoperatively. These women reported significantly more severe symptoms of SUI and OAB (p < 0.05). Sixty percent reported improvement or cure of NE postoperatively, and this was dependent on improvement or cure of SUI (p < 0.005). The presence of NE was a negative predictor for improvement in symptoms of SUI following TVT (p = 0.037).

This study provides insight into NE, a commonly reported symptom in women attending urogynaecology clinics. To our knowledge, this is the first study to implicate stress incontinence as an important aetiological factor in women with NE. Further studies are required to better understand the aetiology of NE in adult women and relate this to management and outcome.

International urogynecology journal. 2016 Aug 01 [Epub ahead of print]

Patrick Campbell, Weiguang Li, John Money-Taylor, Joanna Davies, Thomas Gray, Stephen Radley

Department of Urogynaecology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Sheffield, UK. ., Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK., Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK., Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK., Department of Urogynaecology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Sheffield, UK., Department of Urogynaecology, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Sheffield, UK.

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