The role of serum C-reactive protein in women with lower urinary tract symptoms - Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS:Some lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) subtypes may be associated with low-grade inflammation.

This study aimed to investigate the role of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in women with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

METHODS: A total of 197 consecutive women with non-stress urinary incontinence (non-SUI) LUTS and 18 healthy women without LUTS (normal controls) were enrolled. LUTS include urinary storage, voiding, and post-micturition symptoms. Patients with previous bladder or urethral surgery, active urinary tract infections, or possible neurogenic lesions were excluded. Serum CRP levels were measured before any treatment was given. Patients were stratified to LUTD subgroups based on a 3-day voiding diary, uroflowmetry, and selective videourodynamic studies.

RESULTS: Median CRP levels were significantly higher in women with overactive bladder (OAB) wet (i.e., with urgency incontinence, n = 30, 0.12 mg/dl) than those in women with bladder oversensitivity (n = 68, 0.075 mg/dl, P = 0.008) and the control group (0.055 mg/dl, P = 0.032). Further analysis revealed that body mass index and maximum flow rate were two independent factors that affected CRP levels. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for using CRP to predict OAB wet was 0.55, and the most predictive cutoff point for CRP was 0.15 mg/dl (sensitivity 43.5 %, specificity 72.7 %).

CONCLUSIONS: High serum CRP levels were found in women with OAB wet, and they were related to lower maximum urinary flow rates and higher body mass indices in non-SUI LUTD. However, serum CRP is not a suitable biomarker for discriminating between subtypes of non-SUI LUTD.

Written by:
Hsiao SM, Lin HH, Kuo HC. Are you the author?
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Banqiao, New Taipei, Taiwan.

Reference: Int Urogynecol J. 2012 Mar 16. Epub ahead of print.
doi: 10.1007/s00192-012-1715-1

PubMed Abstract
PMID: 22422219

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