Aggressiveness and extent of prostatic inflammation relates with serum PSA levels in type IV prostatitis - Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship of the histopathologic grade and extent of prostatic inflammation with the level of serum PSA in patients with type IV prostatitis.

METHODS: We performed transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy for 120 patients suspected of prostate cancer and included in this study only those with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostatitis (n = 46), excluding the cases with prostate cancer and those with BPH but no prostatitis. We evaluated the relationship between prostatic inflammation and serum PSA levels based on the three-grade pathohistologic criteria for the extent, location and aggressiveness of prostatic inflammation. The serum tPSA levels, fPSA levels, % fPSA, and PSAD were compared among different groups.

RESULTS: As for the extent of inflammation, 35 of the 46 included cases were grade I (tPSA: [8.46 +/- 4.09] microg/L; fPSA: [1.75 +/- 0.93] microg/L; PSAD: 0.15 +/- 0.11), 7 were grade II (tPSA: [15.26 +/- 5.26] microg/L; fPSA: [2.54 +/- 0.72] microg/L; PSAD: 0.26 +/- 0.07) and 4 were grade III (tPSA: [21.05 +/- 7.58] microg/L; fPSA: [3. 19 +/- 1.13] microg/L; PSAD: 0.42 +/- 0.19), with statistically significant differences among the three groups in the levels of tPSA (P = 0.001), fPSA (P = 0.008) and PSAD (P < 0.001). Regarding the location of inflammation, 19 cases were grade I, 17 were grade II and 10 were grade II, with no significant differences in tPSA, fPSA and %fPSA among the three grades (P > 0.05). As for the aggressiveness of inflammation, 32 cases were grade I (tPSA: [8.37 +/- 4.07] microg/L; fPSA: [1.76 +/- 0.93] microg/L; PSAD: 0.14 +/- 0.11), 10 were grade II (tPSA: [13.30 +/- 5.69] microg/L; fPSA: [3.27 +/- 2.21] microg/L ; PSAD: 0.25 +/- 0.06) and 4 were grade III (tPSA: [21.05 +/- 7.58] microg/L; fPSA: [3.19 +/- 1.13] microg/L; PSAD: 0.42 +/- 0.19), with statistically significant differences among the three grades in the levels of tPSA (P = 0.002), fPSA (P = 0.024) and PSAD (P < 0.001). The extent of inflammation was positively correlated with the levels of tPSA (r = 0.6, P < 0.001), fPSA (r = 0.5, P = 0.001) and PSAD (r = 0.6, P < 0.001), and so was the aggressiveness of inflammation (tPSA: r = 0.5, P < 0.001; fPSA: r = 0.4, P = 0.008; PSAD: r = 0.7, P < 0.001), but a negative correlation was found between the aggressiveness of inflammation and %fPSA (r = -0.4, P = 0.013).

CONCLUSION: The aggressiveness and extent of prostatic inflammation in asymptomatic prostatitis patients are significantly correlated with the level of serum PSA, which may help pathologists to avoid unnecessary repeated biopsies for patients with high-grade prostatitis.

Written by:
Man LB, Li GZ, Huang GL, Wang JW, Liu BY.   Are you the author?
Department of Urology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing 100035, China.

Reference: Zhonghua Nan Ke Xue. 2012 Aug;18(8):710-4.


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 22934516

Article in Chinese.

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