Comparison of Holmium Laser Enucleation of the Prostate Outcomes in Patients with and without Pre-Operative Urinary Retention

To determine whether outcomes of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) are similar in patients with and without preoperative urinary retention.

From May 2008 to July 2014, 231 patients underwent HoLEP for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia.

Retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate for differences in post-operative outcomes for patients with and without pre-operative urinary retention.

Ninety-five patients (41%) were in retention prior to HoLEP while 136 (59%) were not. Mean follow-up for all patients was 15. 3 months. Patients in retention tended to be older, have larger prostates, and have higher scores on both the American Urological Association symptom score (AUA SS) and bother questionnaires (all p18 mL/s at all post-operative time points for all patients regardless of pre-operative retention status. No patients required long-term catheterization and rates of post-operative complications did not differ significantly during the follow-up period.

This study represents the first direct comparison of HoLEP outcomes in patients with or without urinary retention. There was no increased risk of post-operative urinary retention in patients with pre-operative retention and both groups demonstrated significant post-operative improvement in subjective and objective voiding measures.

The Journal of urology. 2015 Oct 27 [Epub ahead of print]

Niels V Johnsen, Trisha J Kammann, Tracy Marien, Ryan B Pickens, Nicole L Miller

Department of Urologic Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. , Department of Urologic Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. , Department of Urologic Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. , Division of Urology, The University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, Tennessee. , Department of Urologic Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. 

PubMed

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