PURPOSE: Recent data suggest higher physical activity (PA) and lower energy intake (EI) may be associated with a lower risk of kidney stones.

Whether these associations can be reproduced in other study populations after accounting for lifestyle and dietary factors is not known.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed data from three large prospective cohorts, the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) and Nurses' Health Studies (NHS) I and II. Information was collected through validated biennial questionnaires. The hazard ratio (HR) of incident stones among participants within different categories of PA and EI was assessed with Cox proportion hazards regression adjusted for age, BMI, race, comorbidities, medications, calcium supplement use, fluid and nutrient intakes.

RESULTS: The analysis included 215,133 participants. After up to 20 years of follow-up, 5,355 incident cases of kidney stones occurred. In age-adjusted analyses, higher levels of PA were associated with a lower risk of incident kidney stones in women (NHS I and II) but not men. However, after multivariate adjustment, there was no significant association between PA and risk of kidney stones (HPFS: HR for highest vs lowest category 1.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87, 1.14, p for trend=0.94; NHS I: HR 1.01, 95% CI 0.85, 1.19, p for trend = 0.88; NHS II: HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.90, 1.18, p for trend = 0.64). EI was not associated with stone risk (multivariate-adjusted p for trend ≥ 0.49).

CONCLUSIONS: In three large prospective cohorts, there were no independent associations between PA, EI, and incidence of symptomatic kidney stones.

Written by:
Ferraro PM, Curhan GC, Sorensen MD3 Gambaro G, Taylor EN.   Are you the author?
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medical Sciences, Columbus-Gemelli University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Division of Urology, Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Center, and Department of Urology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, USA; Division of Nephrology, Department of Medical Sciences, Columbus-Gemelli University Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; Division of Nephrology and Transplantation, Maine Medical Center, Portland, USA. manuel.ferraro@channing.harvard.edu

Reference: J Urol. 2014 Sep 13. pii: S0022-5347(14)04397-3.
doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2014.09.010


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25229560

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