Gynecologic Organ Involvement During Radical Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer: Is It Time to Routinely Spare the Ovaries?

To determine a subset of women who could undergo ovary-sparing radical cystectomy (OSRC) for bladder cancer without compromising oncologic safety.

A retrospective review was performed of 164 consecutive women who underwent cystectomy at a single tertiary-care center from 1997 to 2018.

Clinicopathologic and preoperative radiographic data were reviewed. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for pathologic stage, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and carcinomain-situ were performed to evaluate the risk of ovarian and reproductive organ (RO) involvement.

A total of 123 women with a median age of 71 years underwent radical cystectomy (RC) with removal of ROs for primary bladder cancer. Nineteen women (15%) had RO involvement by bladder cancer, and 5 of them (4%) were specifically found to have ovarian involvement. Patients with ovarian involvement of bladder cancer had more locally advanced disease (P = .01), LVI (P = .003) and positive margins (P = .003). On multivariable logistic regression, ≥ pT3 (odds ratio = 10.2; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-51.6; P = .005) and LVI (odds ratio = 3.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-14.2; P = .037) were associated with increased risk of RO involvement. Among 15 patients excluded for having a nonbladder primary malignancy, a third had RO involvement, and 2 (13%) had ovarian metastases. No women in our cohort had a primary ovarian malignancy detected at the time of RC.

Women with ovarian involvement by malignancy at the time of RC either had locally advanced disease with LVI or a non-bladder primary malignancy. The risk of incompletely resecting the primary malignancy would be rare if OSRC was performed on women with organ-confined (≤T2) urothelial carcinoma.

Clinical genitourinary cancer. 2018 Oct 29 [Epub ahead of print]

Benjamin L Taylor, Cathleen E Matrai, Ariana L Smith, Abimbola Ayangbesan, Leilei Xia, David M Golombos, Juan Miguel Mosquera, Joseph Nicolas, Brian D Robinson, Douglas S Scherr, Francesca Khani

Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medicine-New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY., Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine-New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY., Division of Urology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA., Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine-New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY; Englander Institute for Precision Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY., Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medicine-New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine-New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY; Englander Institute for Precision Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY., Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medicine-New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine-New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY; Englander Institute for Precision Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY. Electronic address: .

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