Mirabegron for the treatment of overactive bladder: cost effectiveness from US commercial health-plan and Medicare Advantage perspectives

The first class of oral pharmacologic treatments for overactive bladder (OAB) are antimuscarinics that are associated with poor persistence, anticholinergic adverse events, and increased anticholinergic burden (ACB) with risk of cognitive impairment. Mirabegron, a β3-adrenoceptor agonist, is an oral treatment that does not contribute to ACB and has early evidence of improved persistence. The objective of the analysis was to assess the cost-effectiveness of mirabegron for OAB versus six antimuscarinics in the United States.

A Markov state-transition model assessed US commercial health-plan and Medicare Advantage perspectives over a 3-year time horizon in an OAB patient population. Transition probabilities between five micturition and five incontinence severity states were derived from a network meta-analysis of 44 trials of oral OAB treatments. Therapy beginning with an oral OAB agent, could discontinue or switch to another oral agent, and could be followed by tibial nerve stimulation, sacral neuromodulation, or onabotulinumtoxinA. The primary outcome was cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Utilities were mapped from incontinence and micturition frequencies as well as demographics. Based on analysis of data from a large healthcare system, elevated ACB was associated with increased healthcare utilization and probability of cognitive impairment.

From both commercial and Medicare Advantage perspectives, mirabegron was the most clinically effective treatment while oxybutynin was the least expensive. Tolterodine immediate release (IR) was also on the cost-effectiveness frontier. The analysis estimated costs per QALY of $59,690 and $66,347 for mirabegron from commercial health plan and Medicare Advantage perspectives, respectively, compared to tolterodine IR. Other antimuscarinics were dominated.

Our analysis estimated that mirabegron is a cost-effective treatment for OAB from US commercial health plan and Medicare Advantage perspectives, due to fewer projected adverse events and comorbidities, and data suggesting better persistence.

Journal of medical economics. 2016 Jun 21 [Epub ahead of print]

Ronald C Wielage, Sinem Perk, Noll L Campbell, Timothy M Klein, Linda M Posta, Thomas Yuran, Robert W Klein, Daniel B Ng

a Medical Decision Modeling Inc. , Indianapolis IN , USA., a Medical Decision Modeling Inc. , Indianapolis IN , USA., b Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute Inc. , Indianapolis IN , USA., a Medical Decision Modeling Inc. , Indianapolis IN , USA., d Medical Affairs, Americas, Astellas Pharma Global Development , Northbrook IL , USA., d Medical Affairs, Americas, Astellas Pharma Global Development , Northbrook IL , USA., a Medical Decision Modeling Inc. , Indianapolis IN , USA., d Medical Affairs, Americas, Astellas Pharma Global Development , Northbrook IL , USA.

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