Persistence with mirabegron therapy for overactive bladder: A real life experience

To evaluate persistence rates of patients receiving mirabegron therapy for overactive bladder (OAB) within our institution over a 6 month period, identify determinants of early discontinuation of therapy, and assess overall patient satisfaction with treatment.

Hospital prescription data were analyzed in order to identify all patients who had been prescribed mirabegron in our institution. Case notes were retrospectively reviewed to obtain demographic data, previous treatments for OAB, reasons for discontinuation of previous treatments, and duration of treatment with mirabegron. Overall satisfaction with treatment was assessed using the OAB Satisfaction with Treatment Questionnaire (OAB-SAT-q).

One hundred and ninety-seven patients were prescribed mirabegron. Of these, 81% previously discontinued anticholinergic therapy, 14% had previously received intravesical botulinum toxin A therapy, and 19% were prescribed mirabegron first-line. At 3 months 69% persisted with treatment which fell to 48% by 6 months. The commonest reason for discontinuation was lack of efficacy, followed by adverse effects. Overall 32% of patients preferred mirabegron over previous treatments and only 39% were satisfied with mirabegron therapy.

Persistence rates with mirabegron in this group of patients for OAB are satisfactory. The commonest reasons for discontinuation are unmet treatment expectations and adverse effects. We had very few treatment-naïve patients and so further studies are required to assess mirabegron persistence rates with longer-term follow up, as first-line treatment and in different groups of OAB severity. Neurourol. Urodynam. 9999:XX-XX, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Neurourology and urodynamics. 2015 Dec 15 [Epub ahead of print]

Nisha Pindoria, Sachin Malde, Jennifer Nowers, Claire Taylor, Cornelius Kelleher, Arun Sahai

Department of Urology, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom. , Department of Urology, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom. , Department of Urology, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom. , Department of Urology, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom. , Department of Urogynaecology, St. Thomas' Hospital, London, United Kingdom. , Department of Urology, Guy's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

PubMed

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