Comparison of lower urinary tract symptoms between women with detrusor overactivity with impaired contractility (DOIC) and women with detrusor overactivity (DO) with preserved contractility - Abstract

PURPOSE: to compare symptoms between women with detrusor overactivity with impaired contractility (DOIC) and women with detrusor overactivity (DO) and preserved contractility.

METHODS: the study included 359 consecutive women with DO who had multichannel urodynamic test in our department between 2009 and 2011. The women were divided into two groups, those with DOIC (n=151, 42%) and those with DO and preserved contractility (n=208, 58%). Comparison between the two groups was performed.

RESULTS: women with DOIC were older (73.2±17.3 years vs. 54.1±20.7 years, p< 0.001) with high frequency of diabetes mellitus (49% vs. 31%, p< 0.001). The prevalence of previous urinary retention and recurrent cystitis were significantly higher is women with DOIC (7% vs. 1% p< 0.01 and 22% vs. 7% P< 0.001, respectively). The mean post void residual (PVR) was higher in the DOIC group (89±42 ml vs. 21±18 ml, p< 0.001). The mean maximal flow rate was lower in women with DOIC (11±6 ml/sec vs. 23±5 ml/sec, p< 0.001). The frequency of storage symptoms was similar in both groups; however, voiding symptoms were more common in women with DOIC (slow stream 69% vs. 42%, intermittent stream (72% vs. 26%, hesitancy 35% vs. 22%, straining 84% vs. 26%, terminal dribble 73% vs. 42%, incomplete emptying 71% vs. 49%; p< 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: women with DOIC are older than women with DO and preserved detrusor contractility. Urinary retention and recurrent cystitis are more frequent in women with DOIC. Voiding symptoms are significantly more common in women with DOIC.

Written by:
Stav K, Shilo Y, Zisman A, Lindner A, Leibovici D.   Are you the author?
Department of Urology, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Zerifin, Israel Affiliated with Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

Reference: J Urol. 2012 Dec 4. pii: S0022-5347(12)05810-7.
doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2012.11.178


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 23220247

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