Patient preference elicitation instrument, OABCare, to facilitate shared decision-making in the care of overactive bladder.

To describe the development and feasibility of a preference elicitation instrument, OABCare, using choice-based adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA) among patients with overactive bladder (OAB).

This was a two-phase study. In Phase 1, an extensive literature review along with patient and provider focus groups yielded the attributes and levels for our OABCare instrument. The hierarchical Bayesian random-effects model generated utilities and mean relative importance scores of treatment attributes. Phase 2 consisted of a cohort study to assess the association between OAB treatment uptake and treatment attributes elicited from OABCare, using generalized linear models.

Literature review and provider and patient focus groups in Phase 1 yielded themes related to OAB management that were used to develop 11 attributes for the ACA instrument. For Phase 2 of the study, 108 patients were recruited who completed the OABCare instrument. Results showed that the top five attributes with the highest mean utility values were caregiver burden, impaired bladder function, social interaction constraints, treatment side effects, and use of pads. In addition, impaired bladder function (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 2.1), disturbed sleep (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.04, 1.47), social interaction constraints (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.05, 1.32), and out-of-pocket costs (OR = 0.79, 95 % CI = 0.61, 0.94) were associated with OAB treatment uptake.

Our ACA-based instrument, OABCare, is a feasible and acceptable tool for assessing preferences in OAB patients. Preference assessment can facilitate shared decision-making and may enhance the quality of OAB care. Future work will evaluate the OABCare instrument in different subgroups based on sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics, and its integration into clinical care settings.

Neurourology and urodynamics. 2021 Feb 10 [Epub ahead of print]

Sumedha Chhatre, Diane K Newman, Alan J Wein, Ravishankar Jayadevappa

Department of Psychiatry, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA., Division of Urology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA., Department of Medicine, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

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