Depressive symptoms in individuals diagnosed with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) in middle-aged and older Chinese individuals: Results from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study.

Male lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) is common and may increase the risk of depressive symptoms. This study aimed to investigate the associated factors of LUTS/BPH and its association with depressive symptoms in middle-aged and older Chinese men.

This study used data from the 2015 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). A total number of 8,586 men aged ≥45 years were included in this study. Participants answered positively to whether they have ever been diagnosed with a prostate illness (excluding prostatic cancer) were defined as LUTS/BPH individuals. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CESD-10). Multivariate logistic analyses were applied to explore the associated factors of LUTS/BPH, association between LUTS/BPH and depressive symptoms, and risk factors of depressive symptoms according to LUTS/BPH status.

The weighted overall prevalence of LUTS/BPH was 13.1% in Chinese men aged ≥45 years. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 29.1% in LUTS/BPH individuals and 22.9% in non-LUTS/BPH individuals. Depressive symptoms and LUTS/BPH shared some same risk factors, which were education, living regions, annual household consumption, sleep duration and multimorbidity. The results from logistic models showed that education, sleep duration and multimorbidity were significantly and independently associated with depression of LUTS/BPH individuals (P<0.001).

Prevalence of depressive symptoms in LUTS/BPH population was higher than in non-LUTS/BPH population. Education, sleep duration and multimorbidity were associated with the onset of depressive symptoms in LUTS/BPH individuals (P<0.001).

Journal of affective disorders. 2021 Sep 20 [Epub ahead of print]

Weiyu Zhang, Guiying Cao, Yiran Sun, Feng Wu, Qi Wang, Tao Xu, Hao Hu, Kexin Xu

Department of Urology, Peking University People's Hospital, 100044 Beijing, China., Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, 100191 Beijing, China; Medical Informatics Center, Peking University, 100191 Beijing, China., Institute for Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese PLA, 100071 Beijing, China., Department of Urology, Peking University People's Hospital, 100044 Beijing, China. Electronic address: ., Department of Urology, Peking University People's Hospital, 100044 Beijing, China. Electronic address: .

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