Uric acid stones increase the risk of chronic kidney disease

The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of uric acid stones and their potential risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 401 patients (196 with uric acid stone and 205 without) were enrolled from our database of patients with urolithiasis. We analyzed the clinical demographic features, stone location, urine chemistries, and renal function. There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between the two groups in terms of age, with the higher mean age in the uric acid group. Patients with uric acid stones had much lower pH of urine (p < 0.001) and higher serum uric acid level (p = 0.002). Notably, those with uric acid stones had worse eGFR than those with non-uric acid stones. Multivariate analysis confirmed that age over 60 years (ORs = 9.19; 95% CI 3.5-24.3), female sex (ORs = 4.01; 95% CI 1.8-9.0), hyperuricemia (ORs = 8.47; 95% CI 1.6-43.5), and uric acid stone (OR = 2.86; 95% CI 1.2-6.7) were the independent predictors of poor prognoses in CKD. Therefore, an association exists between uric acid stones and higher prevalence of CKD. Patients with uric acid stones may need close monitoring of renal function during follow-up.

Urolithiasis. 2018 Feb 28 [Epub ahead of print]

Ching-Chia Li, Tsu-Ming Chien, Wen-Jeng Wu, Chun-Nung Huang, Yii-Her Chou

Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, No. 100, Tz-You 1st Road, Kaohsiung, 807, Taiwan., Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, No. 100, Tz-You 1st Road, Kaohsiung, 807, Taiwan. .

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