Intermittent Catheters

Validation of the InCaSaQ, a new tool for the evaluation of patient satisfaction with clean intermittent self-catheterization - Abstract

Aims: In neurourology, the choice of catheter is of paramount importance. At the time of our study, no simple validated questionnaire has been published, evaluating patient satisfaction with the use of urinary catheters.

Ensuring patient adherence to clean intermittent self-catheterization - Abstract

Patient performance of clean intermittent self-catheterization is a crucial component of the management of incomplete bladder emptying, which can arise from a variety of conditions.

Intermittent self catheterisation with hydrophilic, gel reservoir, and non-coated catheters: A systematic review and cost effectiveness analysis - Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the most effective and cost effective type of catheter for patients performing intermittent self catheterisation in the community.

Development and psychometric validation of the intermittent self-catheterization questionnaire

BERKELEY, CA (UroToday.com) - Pinder and colleagues describe the development and validation of the Intermittent Self-Catheterization Questionnaire (ISC-Q).

An overview of male intermittent self-catheterisation

BERKELEY, CA (UroToday.com) - This is a very comprehensive review for clinicians who teach men intermittent self-catheterization (ISC).

Psychological coping with intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) in people with spinal injury: A qualitative study

BERKELEY, CA (UroToday.com) - Shaw and Logan have researched quality of life in men and women performing intermittent self-catheterization (ISC), and this article adds to their body of published research.

A prospective, randomized, cross-over, multicenter study comparing quality of life using compact vs. standard catheters for intermittent self catheterization

BERKELEY, CA (UroToday.com) - This study was a non-blinded, randomized, multicenter, two-way, crossover study with two treatment periods of 6 weeks, in patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction (n=125) who were performing intermittent self-catheterization (ISC).

Urinary tract infection rates associated with re-use of catheters in clean intermittent catheterization of male veterans

BERKELEY, CA (UroToday.com) - This was a retrospective electronic chart review of male veterans, managed by the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center in Chicago, who had been performing clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) for at least 3 months.

No-touch intermittent catheterization: Caregiver point of view on sterility errors, duration, comfort and costs

BERKELEY, CA (UroToday.com) - Despite the lack of evidence, it has always been assumed that the “no touch” catheterization system decreases the risk for infection and increases comfort for caregivers (nurses and nurse students) performing catheterization.

Barriers, complications, adherence, and self-reported quality of life for people using clean intermittent catheterization

BERKELEY, CA (UroToday.com) - This is a pilot study that used cross-sectional survey design to study various complications, adherence, and health-related quality of life in community dwelling men and women who have been using clean intermittent self-catheterization (CISC) for two months or more.

A prospective, randomized, cross-over, multicenter study comparing quality of life using compact vs. standard catheters for intermittent self catheterization - Abstract

Purpose: Intermittent self catheterization (ISC) is the recommended standard treatment for patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. However standard intermittent catheters can be unwieldy, difficult to use and carry discreetly; this can influence the patient's ability to perform catheterization efficiently, discretely and in privacy, and therefore affect the patient's quality of life. The objective was to evaluate whether the compact and discrete design of the compact catheter improves the quality of life for ISC users compared with standard catheters.

Benefits of the insertion tip and closed-system sleeve for intermittent catheterization

Purpose: Typically performed several times a day, intermittent catheterization (IC) is considered a generally safe and effective method for emptying the bladder and can be used on a short or long term basis as needed.

No-touch intermittent catheterization: Caregiver point of view on sterility errors, duration, comfort and costs - Abstract

Aims: To determine which method of intermittent urinary catheterization, sterile with a catheterization-set or the no-touch method, offers the most advantages for caregivers in a hospital setting.

Psychological coping with intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) in people with spinal injury: A qualitative study - Abstract

Background: Management of bladder function is important in rehabilitation of spinal injury. Failure to comply with bladder management techniques, such as intermittent catheterisation, can have long-term consequences leading to renal failure. It is important, therefore, that spinal injured people adapt to the therapy at an early stage, but there is little research aimed at exploring patient experiences of ISC.

Barriers, complications, adherence, and self-reported quality of life for people using clean intermittent catheterization - Abstract

Purpose: To examine barriers, complications, adherence, and health-related quality of life in people using clean intermittent catheterization (CIC).

Is Mitrofanoff a more socially accepted clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) route for children and their families? - Abstract

Aim: We aimed to examine the social impact of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) on children with a neurogenic bladder and to compare the impact of urethral CIC with Mitrofanoff catheterization.

Clean intermittent catheterization and urinary tract infection: Review and guide for future research - Abstract

Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) is considered the method of choice for bladder emptying when neurological or non-neurological causes make normal voiding impossible or incomplete.

Development and psychometric validation of the intermittent self-catheterization questionnaire - Abstract

Background: Intermittent catheterization, often performed by the users themselves and known as intermittent self-catheterization (ISC), has become the gold standard treatment for people with chronic urinary retention. To date, there are no validated patient-reported outcome measures for individuals who rely on ISC that focus on ISC-related quality of life and can help health care professionals and catheter users to optimize long-term ISC care.

An overview of male intermittent self-catheterisation - Abstract

Since the early 1970s intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) has become increasingly popular and is now considered the method of choice for draining retained urine from the bladder and to treat urethral strictures in men.

Urinary tract infection rates associated with re-use of catheters in clean intermittent catheterization of male veterans - Abstract

Advocate Christ Medical Center, Oak Lawn, IL, USA.

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