Clean Intermittent Catheterization Following Urethral Stricture Surgery Using a Low Friction Catheter Versus Conventional Plastic Catheter: A Prospective, Randomized Trial - Supplement

As part of an added supplement, we at UroToday International Journal present the following added information regarding the article "Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: Case Report With Review of the Literature." Reponses are provided by corresponding author Dr. Sallami Satáa.

Q. What does your contribution add to the present knowledge?

A. Clean intermittent catheterization is an efficient way of preventing recurrence after endoscopic urethrotomy. The question is: what type of catheter should be used? Through this prospective and randomized study, we concluded that the hydrophilic catheter type “Lofric” significantly increased the degree of comfort and satisfaction and decreased the feeling of pain when the catheter was removed or inserted compared with a conventional and classic Nelaton polyvinyl chloride catheter. Moreover, complications and recurrent rates were comparable between the 2 types.

Q. What's essential to understand about in terms of clinical practice? 

A. We recommend low-friction hydrophilic catheters to prevent urethral stricture recurrences with better quality of life.

Q. Will this replace existing techniques or therapies now or in the near future?

A. We advise urologists and nurses to avoid the use of conventional Nelaton polyvinyl chloride catheters in clean, intermittent catheterization.

Q. Will it impact the standard of care?

A. The use of low-friction hydrophilic catheters should be considered the standard in clean, intermittent catheterization.

Q. What are the three things that this technology does or enables that I should know to impact clinical practice?

A. The use of low-friction hydrophilic catheters is significantly more comfortable, more satisfactory, less painful (when the catheter was removed or inserted), compared with a conventional and classic Nelaton polyvinyl chloride catheter.

Q. What's your take-home message for me as your colleague? 

A. When clean, intermittent catheterization is considered, low-friction hydrophilic catheters must be used.

 

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