[What does the oncologist need from the pathologist in testicular cancer?]

Testicular type II germ cell tumours (GCTs) are an exemplar of a curable cancer and the most common malignancy in males aged ≤35 years. Even in metastatic stages, about 70% of patients can be cured by cisplatin-based chemotherapy and multimodal treatments. For patients failing platinum-based standard therapy, prognosis is poor and novel biomarkers and therapeutic options are urgently needed.

Discussion of desired histopathological information to guide urologists' and oncologists' decision making in the treatment of male GCTs.

A narrative review of histopathological key features of male GCT tissue samples for clinical decision making.

Histopathological workup is crucial to identify (i) a GCT origin in cancers of unknown primary based on isochromosome 12p (i(12p)) detection, (ii) the different type II GCT subtypes, and (iii) risk factors, i.e. lymphovascular or rete testis invasion, among others. Proper histopathological diagnosis is indispensable for guideline-endorsed, histology-driven, and risk-adapted treatment decisions, hereby helping to maintain treatment success while reducing the therapeutic burden and potential long-term sequelae of multimodal treatments. For refractory patients failing standard treatment options, prognosis remains poor and, so far, neither predictive or prognostic biomarkers nor novel therapeutic targets have been established.

Close interaction and interdisciplinary discussion of histopathologic and radiologic findings and established risk factors including serum tumour markers is crucial for successful treatment including intensified strategies, where necessary, or prevention of overtreatment, where possible.

Der Pathologe. 2020 Dec 02 [Epub ahead of print]

Christoph Oing, Mia-Carlotta Peters, Felix Bremmer

Klinik für Onkologie, Hämatologie und Stammzelltransplantation mit Abteilung für Pneumologie, Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246, Hamburg, Deutschland. ., Klinik für Onkologie, Hämatologie und Stammzelltransplantation mit Abteilung für Pneumologie, Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246, Hamburg, Deutschland., Institut für Pathologie, Universitätsmedizin Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075, Göttingen, Deutschland.

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