Management of Late Relapses After Chemotherapy in Testicular Cancer: Optimal Outcomes with Dose-intense Salvage Chemotherapy and Surgery.

Late relapse (LR) in testicular cancer is defined as disease recurrence more than 2yr after primary treatment. Optimal management for this rare group is unknown.

To identify prognostic factors relevant to outcomes in a large LR series following primary treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy.

We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients treated for advanced testicular cancer within the Anglian Germ Cell Cancer Network between 1995 and 2016. We identified 53 cases of LR following initial treatment for metastatic disease with platinum-based chemotherapy, and collected data on patient and tumour characteristics, treatments, and outcomes.

Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated for all patients. Survival curves were plotted according to the Kaplan-Meier method and univariate analysis of descriptive variables was performed using the log-rank method.

Across the cohort, PFS at 36 mo was 41% and OS was 61%. Multiple factors were correlated with PFS. Use of dose-intense or high-dose chemotherapy was associated with better PFS compared to conventional-dose chemotherapy (PFS 48 vs 9.8 mo; p=0.0036). Resection of residual disease post-relapse chemotherapy was associated with better PFS (hazard ratio 3.46; p=0.0076). There was a nonsignificant trend towards worse PFS in very late (>7 yr) relapses. The study is limited by its retrospective nature and selection bias cannot be excluded.

This study provides new insight into prognostic factors in LR. It confirms that surgery is critical to optimal outcomes, and suggests that dose-intense or high-dose chemotherapy in multisite nonresectable disease should be considered wherever feasible.

We studied patients with testicular cancer that recurred at least 2yr after initial treatment with chemotherapy. We found that patients who are able to have surgery to remove cancer and who have more intensive chemotherapy may be more likely to live longer.

European urology focus. 2020 May 04 [Epub ahead of print]

Constantine Alifrangis, Olivia Lucas, Sarah Benafif, Wendy Ansell, Michelle Greenwood, Shievon Smith, Peter Wilson, Ben Thomas, Sarah Rudman, Danish Mazhar, Dan Berney, Jonathan Shamash

Department of Medical Oncology, St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK; Division of Cancer, University College London Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: ., Department of Medical Oncology, St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK., Department of Surgery, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, UK., Department of Medical Oncology, Guys Hospital, London, UK., Department of Medical Oncology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, UK., Department of Molecular Oncology, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.

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