Androgen Deprivation Alters Attention to Sexually Provocative Visual Stimuli in Elderly Men

Testosterone is known to regulate male sexual interest, but the exact way that androgens influence men's sexual cognition remains unclear.

To investigate the influence of androgen deprivation (AD) on visual responses to sexually suggestive stimuli in men treated for prostate cancer with AD therapy.

Patients with AD-treated prostate cancer, patients with prostate cancer not on AD therapy, and age-matched healthy control participants were exposed to images of male and female runway models fully or minimally clothed. Eye tracking was used to compare looking behavior among groups.

Proportion of fixations on fully clothed vs minimally clothed models and proportion of fixations on target areas of interest (ie, legs, chest, pelvis, and face) of fully clothed and minimally clothed models were analyzed and compared among groups.

Although men not on AD exhibited a larger proportion of fixations on the minimally clothed compared with the fully clothed images, there was no difference between the 2 image types for men on AD. This was true regardless of whether the images depicted male or female models. Groups did not differ in their fixations to target areas of interest.

These results suggest that testosterone can influence men's visual attention to sexual stimuli; specifically, AD can attenuate the time spent fixated on sexualized targets. Palmer-Hague JL, Tsang V, Skead C, et al. Androgen Deprivation Alters Attention to Sexually Provocative Visual Stimuli in Elderly Men. Sex Med 2017;5:e245-e254.

Sexual medicine. 2017 Dec [Epub]

Jaime L Palmer-Hague, Vivian Tsang, Charlenn Skead, Richard J Wassersug, Eleni Nasiopoulos, Alan Kingstone

Department of Psychology, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, Canada. Electronic address: ., Faculty of Science, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada., Department of Psychology, Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, Canada., Department of Medical Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada; Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia., Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.