Cancer in Australia: Actual incidence data from 1982 to 2013 and mortality data from 1982 to 2014 with projections to 2017

Cancer is a major cause of illness in Australia and therefore ongoing monitoring of cancer in Australia is important. This study sources data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) and reports actual number of cases diagnosed and deaths, for all cancers combined and selected cancers, from 1982 to 2013 for incidence and from 1982 to 2014 for mortality, with projections to 2017 for both. It is estimated that 134 174 new cases of cancer (excluding basal and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin) will be diagnosed in 2017. The number of new cancer cases more than doubled from 47 414 in 1982. Prostate cancer is estimated to be the most commonly diagnosed cancer in males in 2017, whereas breast cancer is estimated to be the most commonly diagnosed cancer in females. It is estimated that there will be 47 753 deaths from cancer in Australia in 2017. Although the mortality rate decreased, the number of people who died in Australia from cancer almost doubled from 24 922 in 1982. Lung cancer was the most common cause of cancer death in both males and females. In 2011, cancer was the leading cause of disease burden in Australia.

Asia-Pacific journal of clinical oncology. 2017 Sep 20 [Epub ahead of print]

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Fern Hill Park, Bruce, Australia.