Intermediate-term outcome after PSMA-PET guided high-dose radiotherapy of recurrent high-risk prostate cancer patients

By the use of PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) detection of prostate cancer lesions with a high sensitivity and specificity combined with a favorable lesion to background contrast is feasible. Therefore, PSMA-PET is increasingly used for planning of radiotherapy treatment; however, any data on intermediate-term outcome is missing so far.

Patients with high-risk or very high risk prostate cancer, referred for salvage radiotherapy (SRT, n = 22) between 2013 and 2015, underwent PSMA-PET prior to therapy. Irradiation was planned on PET data with boost to macroscopic tumors/metastases. Treatment related toxicity was measured using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE, v4.0).

Findings in PSMA-PET led to treatment modifications in 77% of SRT patients compared to available CT information. One patient did not receive irradiation due to disseminated disease, the other patients received increased boost doses to macroscopic disease and/or inclusion of additional target volumes. Toxicity was low as only 2 patients reported toxicities > grade 1. With a Median follow-up time of 29 in patients that were not lost to follow-up, prolonged PSA responses below baseline were observed in the majority of patients (14 of 20). In hormone-naïve SRT patients (n = 11), radiotherapy led to prolonged PSA decrease in 8/11 patients, however with 3 of these 8 patients receiving repeated PSMA based irradiation of novel lesions during follow-up.

PSMA-PET guided planning of radiotherapy led to change of treatment in the majority of patients. Treatment related toxicity was well tolerated and promising results regarding intermediate-term PSA decrease were observed.

No trial registration was performed due to retrospective evaluation.

Radiation oncology (London, England). 2017 Aug 23*** epublish ***

Sebastian Zschaeck, Peter Wust, Marcus Beck, Waldemar Wlodarczyk, David Kaul, Julian Rogasch, Volker Budach, Christian Furth, Pirus Ghadjar

Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany. ., Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353, Berlin, Germany., Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.