Clinical Application of Circulating Tumour Cells in Prostate Cancer: From Bench to Bedside and Back

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men worldwide. To improve future drug development and patient management, surrogate biomarkers associated with relevant outcomes are required. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are tumour cells that can enter the circulatory system, and are principally responsible for the development of metastasis at distant sites. In recent years, interest in detecting CTCs as a surrogate biomarker has ghiiukjrown. Clinical studies have revealed that high levels of CTCs in the blood correlate with disease progression in patients with prostate cancer; however, their predictive value for monitoring therapeutic response is less clear. Despite the important progress in CTC clinical development, there are critical requirements for the implementation of their analysis as a routine oncology tool. The goal of the present review is to provide an update on the advances in the clinical validation of CTCs as a surrogate biomarker and to discuss the principal obstacles and main challenges to their inclusion in clinical practice.

International journal of molecular sciences. 2016 Sep 20*** epublish ***

Luis León-Mateos, María Vieito, Urbano Anido, Rafael López López, Laura Muinelo Romay

Axencia Galega de Coñecemento en Saúde (ACIS), SERGAS, Avda, Fernando de Casa Novoa, Santiago de Compostela 15707, Spain. ., London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON N6A 4L6, Canada. ., Translational Medical Oncology/Liquid Biopsy Analysis Unit, Health Research Institute of Santiago (IDIS), Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela (SERGAS), Trav. Choupana s/n, Santiago de Compostela 15706, Spain. ., Translational Medical Oncology/Liquid Biopsy Analysis Unit, Health Research Institute of Santiago (IDIS), Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela (SERGAS), Trav. Choupana s/n, Santiago de Compostela 15706, Spain. ., Translational Medical Oncology/Liquid Biopsy Analysis Unit, Health Research Institute of Santiago (IDIS), Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela (SERGAS), Trav. Choupana s/n, Santiago de Compostela 15706, Spain. .