Use of stereotactic body radiotherapy for prostate cancer in the United States from 2004 through 2012.

Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a newer treatment option for patients with localized prostate cancer. The rates of diffusion of this technology across the United States are unknown. The goal of the current study was to describe the use of SBRT among patients with prostate cancer based on different risk groups (low, intermediate, or high risk) and by type of facility (community cancer program, comprehensive community cancer program, or academic program) in which patients were treated.

Using the National Cancer Data Base, a national registry that contains approximately 70% of patients with cancer in the United States, the authors identified 274,466 men between the ages of 40 to 80 years who were diagnosed from 2004 to 2012 with localized prostate cancer and received radiation therapy (RT) as their initial treatment. The authors described the prevalence of SBRT use each year, and multivariable analysis was used to examine factors associated with the receipt of SBRT.

In 2004, SBRT use was low (<1% in all patient groups), and was observed to increase steadily each year. By 2012, 8.8% of low-risk patients treated at academic centers with RT received SBRT. Uptake of SBRT was highest in patients with low-risk or intermediate-risk disease. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that year of diagnosis, type of center, risk group, and race were all significantly associated with the use of SBRT.

To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first report of the adoption of SBRT for localized prostate cancer across the United States. Diffusion was noted to be slowest at community cancer programs, reflecting potential barriers of cost or expertise for this new technology. Adoption of SBRT was found to be highest among patients with low-risk or intermediate-risk disease, in accordance with the bulk of patients included in published SBRT studies. Cancer 2016;000:000-000. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

Cancer. 2016 May 12 [Epub ahead of print]

Brock R Baker, Ramsankar Basak, Jahan J Mohiuddin, Ronald C Chen

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina., Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina., Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina., Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.