Omissions in Urology Residency Training Regarding Sexual Dysfunction Subsequent to Prostate Cancer Treatment: Identifying a Need.

OBJECTIVES - To assess urology residents' current knowledge, practice, previous training, barriers and training needs regarding prostate cancer treatment-related sexual dysfunction.

METHODS - A cross-sectional questionnaire study inventoried the practice patterns and training need of urology residents attending a national training course in June 2015.

RESULTS - Of 101 urology residents throughout The Netherlands, 87 attended the training (response rate 100%). Median age was 32 years (range 28-38); 55⋅2% were woman. Regardless of the residency level, most trainees had never received education about sexual dysfunction (58⋅6%), reported a limited level of knowledge (48⋅3%) and indicated an evident need for training (69⋅4%). The majority did not feel competent to advise prostate cancer patients regarding the treatment of sexual dysfunction (55⋅2%). Almost all participants enquired about pre-operative erectile dysfunction (89⋅7%), and always informed about treatment-related sexual dysfunction (88⋅5%). At follow-up, 63⋅9% of the residents routinely addressed sexual complaints again. More than half of the participants indicated that urology residency training does not provide sufficient education on sexual dysfunction (54⋅8%). Time constraint (67⋅1%) and lack of training (35⋅3%) were the most frequently mentioned barriers.

CONCLUSIONS - Current urology residency does not pay sufficient attention to sexual communication skills and sexual dysfunction. The residents require more knowledge about and more practical training in sexual counseling. Findings support efforts to enhance the education of urology residents regarding prostate cancer treatment-related sexual dysfunction.

Urology. 2016 Jan 06 [Epub ahead of print]

E M Krouwel, L A Grondhuis Palacios, H Putter, R C M Pelger, G J Kloens, H W Elzevier

Department of Urology, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands; PO Box 9600, 2300 WB Leiden. Department of Urology, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands; PO Box 9600, 2300 WB Leiden. , Department of Medical Statistics, Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands; PO Box 9600, 2300 WB Leiden. , Department of Urology, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands; PO Box 9600, 2300 WB Leiden. , Baron S. Wyborghstraat 2, 2225 TE Katwijk, Netherlands. , Department of Urology, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands; PO Box 9600, 2300 WB Leiden.

PubMed

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