Association of Coffee Consumption With Overall and Cause-Specific Mortality in a Large US Prospective Cohort Study.

Concerns about high caffeine intake and coffee as a vehicle for added fat and sugar have raised questions about the net impact of coffee on health. Although inverse associations have been observed for overall mortality, data for cause-specific mortality are sparse.

Additionally, few studies have considered exclusively decaffeinated coffee intake or use of coffee additives. Coffee intake was assessed at baseline by self-report in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Hazard ratios were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Among 90,317 US adults without cancer at study baseline (1998-2001) or history of cardiovascular disease at study enrollment (1993-2001), 8,718 deaths occurred during 805,644 person-years of follow-up from 1998 through 2009. Following adjustment for smoking and other potential confounders, coffee drinkers, as compared with nondrinkers, had lower hazard ratios for overall mortality (

American journal of epidemiology. 2015 Nov 27 [Epub ahead of print]

Erikka Loftfield, Neal D Freedman, Barry I Graubard, Kristin A Guertin, Amanda Black, Wen-Yi Huang, Fatma M Shebl, Susan T Mayne, Rashmi Sinha

PubMed