Locus-specific gene repositioning in prostate cancer.

Genes have preferred spatial positions within interphase cell nuclei. However, positioning patterns are not an innate feature of a locus and genes can alter their localization in response to physiological and pathological changes.

Here we screened the radial positioning patterns of 40 genes in normal, hyperplasic and malignant Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded human prostate tissues. We find that the overall spatial organization of the genome in prostate tissue is largely conserved amongst individuals. We identify three genes whose nuclear positions are robustly altered in neoplastic prostate tissues. FLI1 and MMP9 differently position in prostate cancer compared with normal tissue and prostate hyperplasia, whereas MMP2 is repositioned in both prostate cancer and hyperplasia. Our data point to locus-specific reorganization of the genome during prostate disease.

Molecular biology of the cell. 2015 Nov 12 [Epub ahead of print]

Marc Leshner, Michelle Devine, Gregory W Roloff, Lawrence D True, Tom Misteli, Karen J Meaburn

National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. , National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. , National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. , Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. , National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

PubMed