Prostate-specific antigen bounce after curative brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer: A study of 274 African-Caribbean patients.

Prostate cancer incidence in the African-Caribbean population ranks among the highest worldwide. We aim to evaluate the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics after brachytherapy, which so far remains unknown in this population.

From 2005 to 2013, 371 patients received (125)I brachytherapy of 145 Gy for early-stage prostate cancer. Eligibility criteria were cTNM ≤T2c, Gleason score ≤7, and initial PSA ≤15 ng/mL. Pretreatment androgen deprivation therapy was allowed. PSA bounce was defined as an increase of ≥0. 4 ng/mL, lasting ≥6 months, followed by a decrease without any anticancer therapy. We examined PSA kinetics during followup.

For the 274 patients with at least 24 months followup, median age was 62 years old (range, 45-76). Initial PSA was

PSA bounce in our African-Caribbean population seemed earlier and was more intense than described in other populations. Early increase of PSA should not be ascribed to treatment failure.

Brachytherapy. 2015 Oct 17 [Epub ahead of print]

N Leduc, V Atallah, M Creoff, N Rabia, T Taouil, P Escarmant, V Vinh-Hung

Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Martinique, France. Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Martinique, France. , Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Martinique, France. , Department of Surgical Urology, University Hospital of Martinique, France. , Department of Surgical Urology, University Hospital of Martinique, France. , Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Martinique, France. , Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Martinique, France.

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