Knowledge and attitudes regarding clinical trials and willingness to participate among prostate cancer patients

Enrollment of minorities in clinical trials remains low. Through a California population-based study of men with early stage prostate cancer, we examined the relationships between race/ethnicity and 1) attitudes, 2) knowledge and 3) willingness to participate in clinical trials.

From November 2011-November 2012, we identified all incident cases of prostate cancer in African American, Latino, and Asian American men ages 18-75years, and a random sample of white men diagnosed in 2008, through the California Cancer Registry, living within 60 miles of a site offering ≥1 clinical trial. Participants completed a 30-min telephone interview in English, Spanish, or Chinese. In this cross-sectional population-based study, multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate associations between race/ethnicity and 1) attitudes, 2) knowledge and 3) willingness to participate.

Of 855 participants, 52% were ≥65years, 42% were white, 24% Latino, 19% African American and 15% Asian American. The majority (81%) had medium-to-high health literacy. Compared to non-Latino white men, African American men were less likely to have above average knowledge of clinical trials (OR=0. 55; CI=0. 35-0. 86), as were Asian American (OR=0. 55; CI=0. 33-0. 93) and Latino men (OR=0. 30; CI=0. 18-0. 48). There were no racial/ethnic differences in willingness to participate. The attitude that "researchers are the main beneficiaries" was negatively associated with willingness (OR=0. 63; CI=0. 43-0. 93); the attitude that "patients are the main beneficiaries" was positively associated with willingness to participate (OR=1. 57; CI=1. 07-2. 29).

Men with early stage prostate cancer are willing to take part in clinical trials and this willingness does not vary by race/ethnicity.

Contemporary clinical trials. 2015 Oct 01 [Epub ahead of print]

Celia P Kaplan, Anna Maria Nápoles, Steven Narine, Steven Gregorich, Jennifer Livaudais-Toman, Tung Nguyen, Yan Leykin, Eric J Small

Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA; Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA.  Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA; Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA. , Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA. , Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA. , Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA. , Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA; Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA. , Department of Psychiatry,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA. , Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology,University of CaliforniaSan Francisco, USA.

PubMed

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