Accumulated dose to the rectum, measured using dose-volume histograms and dose-surface maps, is different from planned dose in all patients treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

We sought to calculate accumulated dose (DA) to the rectum in patients treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer. We were particularly interested in whether dose-surface maps (DSMs) provide additional information to dose-volume histograms (DVHs).

Manual rectal contours were obtained for kilovoltage and daily megavoltage CT scans for 10 participants from the VoxTox study (380 scans). Daily delivered dose recalculation was performed using a ray-tracing algorithm. Delivered DVHs were summated to create accumulated DVHs. The rectum was considered as a cylinder, cut and unfolded to produce daily delivered DSMs; these were summated to produce accumulated DSMs.

Accumulated dose-volumes were different from planned in all participants. For one participant, all DA levels were higher and all volumes were larger than planned. For four participants, all DA levels were lower and all volumes were smaller than planned. For each of these four participants, ≥1% of pixels on the accumulated DSM received ≥5 Gy more than had been planned.

Differences between accumulated and planned dose-volumes were seen in all participants. DSMs were able to identify differences between DA and planned dose that could not be appreciated from the DVHs. Further work is needed to extract the dose data embedded in the DSMs. These will be correlated with toxicity as part of the VoxTox Programme. Advances in knowledge: DSMs are able to identify differences between DA and planned dose that cannot be appreciated from DVHs alone and should be incorporated into future studies investigating links between DA and toxicity.

The British journal of radiology. 2015 Aug 11 [Epub ahead of print]

Jessica E Scaife, Simon J Thomas, Karl Harrison, Marina Romanchikova, Michael P F Sutcliffe, Julia R Forman, Amy M Bates, Raj Jena, M Andrew Parker, Neil G Burnet

1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. , 1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. , 1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. , 1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. , 1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. , 1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. , 1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. , 1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. , 1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK. , 1 Cancer Research UK VoxTox Research Group, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK.

PubMed

E-Newsletters

Newsletter subscription

Free Daily and Weekly newsletters offered by content of interest

The fields of GU Oncology and Urology are rapidly advancing. Sign up today for articles, videos, conference highlights and abstracts from peer-review publications by disease and condition delivered to your inbox and read on the go.

Subscribe