Long-term outcomes of intensity-modulated radiation therapy combined with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy under an early salvage policy for patients with T3-T4N0M0 prostate cancer.

Long-term outcomes of dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with neoadjuvant (NA) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) under an early salvage policy in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) were evaluated.

Data from 120 patients with T3-T4N0M0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with IMRT were analyzed. NA-ADT with a median duration of 6 months was provided in all cases. Seventy-eight Gy, at 2 Gy per fraction, was delivered to the prostate and seminal vesicles. Adjuvant ADT (A-ADT) was not provided for any patient following the completion of IMRT. Salvage ADT (S-ADT) commenced when PSA values >4 ng/ml.

The median follow-up period was 97 months. S-ADT was initiated in 39 patients. The median PSA value at the initiation of S-ADT was 5.7 ng/ml. The 8-year biochemical relapse-free survival, prostate cancer-specific survival, overall survival and S-ADT-free rates were 53.2 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 43.4, 62.1], 96.6 % (95 % CI 91.2, 98.7), 89.1 % (95 % CI 81.5, 93.7) and 66.6 % (95 % CI 60, 74.6), respectively. The estimated 8-year cumulative incidence rates of grade 2-3 late gastrointestinal, and grade 2-3 genitourinary toxicity were 7.6 and 10.7 %, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity was observed.

High-dose IMRT, combined with NA-ADT for LAPC, was associated with favorable long-term disease-specific and overall survival outcomes, despite non-provision of A-ADT under the early S-ADT provision policy. This approach may represent a viable alternative to uniform provision of long-term A-ADT, because two-thirds of the patients maintained ADT-free status over an 8-year period after IMRT. Prospective trials will be required.

International journal of clinical oncology 2015 Jul 04 [Epub ahead of print]

Takashi Mizowaki, Yoshiki Norihisa, Kenji Takayama, Itaru Ikeda, Haruo Inokuchi, Kiyonao Nakamura, Tomomi Kamba, Takahiro Inoue, Toshiyuki Kamoto, Osamu Ogawa, Masahiro Hiraoka

Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan mizo@kuhp kyoto-u ac jp , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan , Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan , Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan , Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan , Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan , Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan

PubMed