Prostate Cancer Knowledge and Decision Making Among African-American Men and Women in the Southeastern United States.

This study used multiple methods for assessing African-American (AA) men's and their female relatives, friends, and significant others' knowledge and cancer-related decision-making practices within the context of a prostate cancer (PrCA) education program. Data were collected from 81 participants using qualitative focus groups and 49 participants also completed quantitative pre/post surveys.

Findings showed that men often relied on their female "significant other" and doctors for guidance on cancer-related decisions. Women described their role in assisting with their male partners' cancer decisions. AA men's and women's knowledge scores increased between pre- and post-tests which can indicate a greater likelihood of future participation in informed cancer-related decision making. Also, using multiple methods in formative research can provide relevant information for developing effective cancer-related interventions.

Int J Mens Health. 2015 Spring;14(1):55-70.

Owens OL1, Jackson DD2, Thomas TL3, Friedman DB2, Hébert JR4.

1 College of Social Work, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC, 29208 ; Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC, 29208.
2 Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC, 29208 ; Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC, 29208.
3 Department of Health Promotion, Education, and Behavior, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC, 29208.
4 Statewide Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC, 29208 ; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia SC, 29208.