Complications after radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Results of a population-based, propensity score-matched analysis - Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess rates of treatment-related complications after radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy monotherapy, using propensity score matching to account for baseline differences between these patient populations.

METHODS: On the basis of a population-based study of men undergoing surgery or radiotherapy for prostate cancer in Ontario between 2002 and 2009, we undertook a propensity score-matched analysis including age, comorbidity, and year of treatment to assess treatment-related complication end points. These included hospital admission; urologic, rectal, or anal procedures; open surgeries; and secondary malignancies.

RESULTS: From the original cohort of 32,465 patients, 15,870 (48.9%) had surgery and 16,595 (51.1%) had radiation. Propensity score matching produced 8797 pairs (17,594 patients). Among these, when compared with patients treated with surgery, those treated with radiation experienced fewer admissions to hospital (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-0.92) and urologic procedures (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.46-0.53) at year 1 but higher rates at year 3 (HR, 5.65; 95% CI, 4.61-6.91 and HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.62-2.13, respectively) and year 5. Although there was no significant difference in open surgeries at year 1, patients undergoing radiotherapy were at higher risk by year 3 (HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.23-3.47) and this rose by year 5. Over the study period, patients undergoing radiotherapy experienced more rectal-anal procedures (HR, 2.64; 95% CI, 2.37-2.95) and were diagnosed with more secondary malignancies (HR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.16-5.14). Direct matching produced similar results.

CONCLUSION: From a propensity score-matched analysis, we found that patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer had higher rates of long-term complications in all 5 categories studied than patients undergoing surgery.

Written by:
Wallis CJ, Herschorn S, Saskin R, Su J, Klotz LH, Chang M, Kulkarni GS, Lee Y, Kodama RT, Narod SA, Nam RK.   Are you the author?
Division of Urology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Evaluative Clinical Sciences, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Urology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  

Reference: Urology. 2015 Mar;85(3):621-7.
doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2014.11.037


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25733275

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