Knowledge of prostate cancer among males attending a urology clinic, a South African study - Abstract

BACKGROUND: In South Africa, the rate of histologically diagnosed prostate cancer is 40.1 per 100 000 in whites and 14 per 100 000 in blacks.

However, blacks have limited access to diagnostic facilities and present late with an advanced disease. Knowledge about prostate cancer in the South African male population is necessary in order to increase the acceptance of early prostate cancer screening.

OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the knowledge of prostate cancer among men attending the urology outpatient clinic at a tertiary hospital in South Africa.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from February to March 2010. A structured questionnaire was administered to participants using consecutive sampling of eligible patients and consisted of sections on sociodemographic details and knowledge about prostate cancer. A total of 346 males, 35 years of age and older, participated in the study.

RESULTS: The majority of the respondents (n = 258; 75.0%) were black, married (n = 220; 64.0%), from the Free State Province (n = 320; 92.8%), and had access to television (n = 248; 71.7%). Only 38 (11.0%) knew the three main symptoms and signs associated with prostate cancer. Level of school education, race and language were statistically significantly associated with level of knowledge whereas age and marital status were not.

CONCLUSION: More than half (54.4%) of the respondents had not heard of prostate cancer. The majority of men who had heard of prostate cancer had a moderate level of knowledge. The factors significantly associated with level of knowledge need to be considered in educational campaigns, prostate cancer screening and treatment.

Written by:
Mofolo N, Betshu O, Kenna O, Koroma S, Lebeko T, Claassen FM, Joubert G.   Are you the author?
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, 205 Nelson Mandela Drive, Bloemfontein, South Africa; Medical students, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa; Department of Urology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa; Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.

Reference: Springerplus. 2015 Feb 10;4:67.
doi: 10.1186/s40064-015-0824-y


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25713760

UroToday.com Prostate Cancer Section

E-Newsletters

Newsletter subscription

Free Daily and Weekly newsletters offered by content of interest

The fields of GU Oncology and Urology are rapidly advancing. Sign up today for articles, videos, conference highlights and abstracts from peer-review publications by disease and condition delivered to your inbox and read on the go.

Subscribe