Significant association of metabolic indices, lipid profile, and androgen levels with prostate cancer - Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To compare the metabolic indices, lipid profile, androgens, and prostate specific antigen between prostate cancer and BPH and between grades of prostate cancer in a cross-sectional study.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study enrolled 95 cases of prostate cancer and 95 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Prostate gland volume was measured using transrectal ultrasound. We compared insulin, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, prostate specific antigen levels and lipid profile between prostate cancer of different grades and BPH. Further, prostate cancer patients were classified into low grade and high grade. Unpaired t-test for normally distributed variables and Man-Whitney U test for non-normal variables were used to assess differences.

RESULTS: We found that prostate cancer patients had significantly higher levels of insulin, testosterone, PSA, cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) in comparison to their BPH counterparts. Higher levels of these parameters also correlated with a higher grade of the disease.

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that higher levels of insulin, testosterone, PSA, and cholesterol correlate with a higher risk of prostate cancer, and also with a higher grade of the disease.

Written by:
Tewari R, Chhabra M, Natu SM, Goel A, Dalela D, Goel MM, Rajender S.   Are you the author?
Department of Pathology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India.  ;

Reference: Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2014;15(22):9841-6.


PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25520115

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