Fiducial marker implantation in prostate radiation therapy: Complication rates and technique - Abstract

PURPOSE: This study aims to report the complication rate from the transrectal ultrasound-guided implantation of gold seed markers in prostate radiotherapy, as well as describing the technique used.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between May 2010 and December 2012, 169 patients with localized prostate cancer had an intraprostatic fiducial marker implantation under transrectal ultrasound guidance. The procedure included prophylactic antibiotic therapy, fleet enema, implantation performed by trained radiation oncologists at our center prior to image-guided radiotherapy. Toxicity occurring between implantation and subsequent radiotherapy start date was assessed. The following parameters were analyzed via medical chart review: antibiotic therapy, anticoagulant interruption, bleeding, pain, prostate volume, number of markers implanted, post-implantation complications and delay before starting radiotherapy.

RESULTS: Of the 169 men, 119 (70.4%) underwent insertion of 4 fiducial markers and the other 50 (29.6%) had 3. The procedure was well-tolerated. There was no interruption of the implantation with regards to pain or hemorrhage. No grade 3 or 4 complications were observed. Seed migration rate was 0.32%, for the migration of 2 markers on 626 implanted. Mean prostate volume was 38cm3 (range: 10-150cm3). Two patients (1.18%) developed a urinary tract infection following the procedure: prostate volume of 25 and 65cm3, four gold seed markers implanted, urinary tract infection resistant to prophylactic antibiotherapy, and treated with antibiotics specific to their infection as determined on urine culture.

CONCLUSION: Transrectal fiducial marker implantation for image-guided radiotherapy in prostate cancer is a well-tolerated procedure without major associated complications.

Written by:
Fawaz ZS, Yassa M, Nguyen DH, Vavassis P.   Are you the author?
Department of Radiation Oncology, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Canada.  

Reference: Cancer Radiother. 2014 Dec;18(8):736-9.
doi: 10.1016/j.canrad.2014.07.160

PubMed Abstract
PMID: 25451675 Prostate Cancer Section